The Creative Constant

Trying to be happy - trying to stay creative

thespookbythedoor:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie smiles during a Q&A session after the screening of the film version of her award-winning book “Half of a Yellow Sun,” as part of TransAfrica Forum’s New African Films Festival at the AFI Silver Theatre in Silver Spring, MD.

thespookbythedoor:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie smiles during a Q&A session after the screening of the film version of her award-winning book “Half of a Yellow Sun,” as part of TransAfrica Forum’s New African Films Festival at the AFI Silver Theatre in Silver Spring, MD.

3 weeks ago

nubianbrothaz:

afrikan-mapambano:

Che Guevara taught us we could dare to have confidence in ourselves, confidence in our abilities and He instilled in us the conviction that struggle is our only recourse and He was a citizen of the free world that together we are in the process of building That is why we say that Che Guevara is also African and Burkinabe — Thomas Sankara, commonly referred to as ‘Africa’s Che Guevara’

nubianbrothaz:

afrikan-mapambano:

Che Guevara taught us we could dare to have confidence in ourselves, confidence in our abilities and He instilled in us the conviction that struggle is our only recourse and He was a citizen of the free world that together we are in the process of building That is why we say that Che Guevara is also African and Burkinabe — Thomas Sankara, commonly referred to as ‘Africa’s Che Guevara’

Make your own banner at MyBannerMaker.com

1 month ago

How Slavery Led To Modern Capitalism

This is so important

(Source: knowledgeequalsblackpower, via blackafricanandbeautiful)

disciplesofmalcolm:

Malcolm X, Oxford Union Debate, December 3, 1964

Excerpt:

“And in my opinion, the young generation of whites, blacks, browns, whatever else there is, you’re living at a time of extremism, a time of revolution, a time when there’s got to be a change, people in power have misused it, and now there has to be a change. And a better world has to be built and the only way it’s going to be built is with extreme methods. And I, for one, will joint in with anyone — don’t care what color you are — as long as you want to change this miserable condition that exists on this earth.

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

Malcolm X's image debased by Nicki Minaj

Petition started by Rosa Clemente to force Nicki Minaj and Young Money to remove the photo of Malcolm X they have used to promote her new single. The use of this image is nothing short of ridiculous. And if she/they did it to create a buzz so they could sell more records, it’s even lower…

The Geto Boys’ Bushwick Bill (right) had some of the illest and realest lyrics in the rap game…
The World is a Ghetto - Bushwick Bill’s Verse:

"Five hundred n**gas died in guerilla warfare
In a village in Africa, but didn’t nobody care
They just called up the goddamn gravedigga
And said come get these muthafuckin n**gas
Just like they do in the 5th Ward
In the South Park and The Bronx and the Watts
You know they got crooked cops
Working for the system
Makin’ po muthafuckas out of victims
Don’t nobody give a fuck about the po
It’s double jeopardy if your black or latino
They got muthafuckin drugs in the slums
Got us killing one another over crumbs
Think I’m lying? Well muthafucka I got proof
Name a section in your city where minorities group
And I’mma show you prostitutes, dope and hard times
And a murder rate that never declines
And little babies sittin on the porch smellin’ smelly
Cryin cause they ain’t got no food in they bellies
They call my neighbourhood a jungle
And me an animal, like they do the people in Rawanda
Fools fleeing their countries to come here black
But see the same bullshit and head right back
They find out what others already know
The world is a ghetto”

The Geto Boys’ Bushwick Bill (right) had some of the illest and realest lyrics in the rap game…
The World is a Ghetto - Bushwick Bill’s Verse:

"Five hundred n**gas died in guerilla warfare
In a village in Africa, but didn’t nobody care
They just called up the goddamn gravedigga
And said come get these muthafuckin n**gas
Just like they do in the 5th Ward
In the South Park and The Bronx and the Watts
You know they got crooked cops
Working for the system
Makin’ po muthafuckas out of victims
Don’t nobody give a fuck about the po
It’s double jeopardy if your black or latino
They got muthafuckin drugs in the slums
Got us killing one another over crumbs
Think I’m lying? Well muthafucka I got proof
Name a section in your city where minorities group
And I’mma show you prostitutes, dope and hard times
And a murder rate that never declines
And little babies sittin on the porch smellin’ smelly
Cryin cause they ain’t got no food in they bellies
They call my neighbourhood a jungle
And me an animal, like they do the people in Rawanda
Fools fleeing their countries to come here black
But see the same bullshit and head right back
They find out what others already know
The world is a ghetto”

thisisjamaica:

Reggae singer ‘Bunny Rugs’ Clarke dies at age 65 

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

William “Bunny Rugs” Clarke, the husky-voiced lead singer of internationally popular reggae band Third World, died of leukemia at his home in Florida, longtime friends and colleagues said Monday. He was 65.

Former bandmate Colin Leslie said the singer died Sunday in Orlando a week after he was released from a hospital following cancer treatment.

Clarke worked with the band Inner Circle and top reggae producer Lee “Scratch” Perry in Jamaica before joining Third World in 1976. The next year, the band released “96 Degrees in the Shade,” one of its most popular albums. The group was signed to Island Records and had hits on British and U.S. charts, including “Now That We Found Love,” “Always Around” and “Reggae Ambassador.” He performed on all of Third World’s records except the group’s debut.

Stevie Wonder, who performed on stage with the band at Jamaica’s Reggae Sunsplash festival in 1981, wrote and produced Third World’s 1982 song “Try Jah Love.”

"He was a remarkable talent. Bunny had a great voice, something even Stevie Wonder admired," Leslie said.

Clarke and Third World were known for seamlessly fusing reggae with soul and pop music, something they were occasionally criticized for by reggae purists. In a 1992 interview with Billboard magazine, he described the band’s identity this way: “Strictly a reggae band, no. Definitely a reggae band, yes.”

Drummer Willie Stewart, who kept the beat in Third World until 1997, said Monday that the fun-loving Clarke “loved his art but always had a joke.”

In a government statement noting Clarke’s death, Culture Minister Lisa Hanna said: “Bunny Rugs’ voice was distinct. He had a charisma and stage presence that was spellbinding with a smile that was vibrant.”

Clarke is survived by his wife and eight children.



RIP